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Lawrence Nelson Wilbur (1897-1988)

Lawrence Nelson Wilbur (1897-1988)


Lawrence Nelson Wilbur was born in December, 1897 in Whitman, MA, a descendant of Myles Standish and Washington's aide-de-camp, General Joseph Reed. His father died when he was 16 and Lawrence worked to support his mother, 2 brothers and 1 sister. He attended night classes in Boston Normal Art School (now Massachusetts School of Art). He went to California in 1921 and worked in the engraving department of the "Los Angeles Times" and, in 1925 relocated to New York City where he enrolled in the Grand Central Art School and studied under Harvey Dunn, N.C. Wyeth and Pruett Carter.

He has an oil, "Sundown in Stonington, Maine" in the National Gallery in Washington, D.C. and has drypoints in the collections of the NY Metropolitan Museum, Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Library of Congress, Boston Public Library and Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Except for a two-year sabbatical to Mexico, he lived the remainder of his life on W. 96th Street in New York, was a life-time member of the Salmagundi Club and won the Audubon Artists medal of honor for his self-portrait in oil, in 1957. A cover article appeared in American Artist Magazine sometime in 1957, written by Frederic Whitaker.

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Lawrence Nelson Wilbur was born in December, 1897 in Whitman, MA, a descendant of Myles Standish and Washington's aide-de-camp, General Joseph Reed. His father died when he was 16 and Lawrence worked to support his mother, 2 brothers and 1 sister. He attended night classes in Boston Normal Art School (now Massachusetts School of Art). He went to California in 1921 and worked in the engraving department of the "Los Angeles Times" and, in 1925 relocated to New York City where he enrolled in the Grand Central Art School and studied under Harvey Dunn, N.C. Wyeth and Pruett Carter.

He has an oil, "Sundown in Stonington, Maine" in the National Gallery in Washington, D.C. and has drypoints in the collections of the NY Metropolitan Museum, Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Library of Congress, Boston Public Library and Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Except for a two-year sabbatical to Mexico, he lived the remainder of his life on W. 96th Street in New York, was a life-time member of the Salmagundi Club and won the Audubon Artists medal of honor for his self-portrait in oil, in 1957. A cover article appeared in American Artist Magazine sometime in 1957, written by Frederic Whitaker.

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