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Mabel Conkling (1871-1966)

Mabel Conkling (1871-1966)

Mabel Conkling (1871-1966)

Known for her public sculptures, especially fountains with figures and allegorical titles such as Goose Girls, Song of the Sea, and Joy of Life.  She also did cemetery urns and relief panels including nymph panels for a swimming pool.

Mabel Conkling was born in Boothbay Harbor, Maine, and during her career, married to sculptor Paul Conkling, lived primarily in New York City but spent the summers in Boothbay Harbor.  She studied in Paris for ten years, including at the Academie Julian and Academy Colarossi, and among her teachers were James McNeill Whister, Raphael Collin, Augustus St. Gaudens and Frederick MacMonnies, who was especially influential in her becoming a sculptor.  

She exhibited in the Paris Salon and in 1900 at the the Expo Universelle.  Other exhibition venues were the St. Louis Expo of 1904; the National Academy of Design, 1907-1929; Pennsylvania Academy, 1911-1927; Art Institute of Chicago, 1916, 1919, 1922 and 1926; and the National Association of Women Painters and Sculptors.

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Known for her public sculptures, especially fountains with figures and allegorical titles such as Goose Girls, Song of the Sea, and Joy of Life.  She also did cemetery urns and relief panels including nymph panels for a swimming pool.

Mabel Conkling was born in Boothbay Harbor, Maine, and during her career, married to sculptor Paul Conkling, lived primarily in New York City but spent the summers in Boothbay Harbor.  She studied in Paris for ten years, including at the Academie Julian and Academy Colarossi, and among her teachers were James McNeill Whister, Raphael Collin, Augustus St. Gaudens and Frederick MacMonnies, who was especially influential in her becoming a sculptor.  

She exhibited in the Paris Salon and in 1900 at the the Expo Universelle.  Other exhibition venues were the St. Louis Expo of 1904; the National Academy of Design, 1907-1929; Pennsylvania Academy, 1911-1927; Art Institute of Chicago, 1916, 1919, 1922 and 1926; and the National Association of Women Painters and Sculptors.

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